Abstract

Abstract:

Following the 1991 “collapse” of the once-unified countries Somalia and Somaliland, efforts to successfully “rebuild” these two nations have met polarizing results. Whereas the de facto state of Somaliland has achieved a relatively high degree of peace and stability by pursuing forms of localized governance in the absence of a strong central government or external interference, southern Somalia has proved unable to pursue their own, preferred system during its constant battle with international actors eager to “assist” the country in forming a strong, national governance structure. Viewed inaccurately by outsiders as an “ungoverned” area, southern Somalia’s attempts at local, effective, and—most importantly—outside actors have ignored, downplayed, or pushed out legitimate governance. In result, misguided efforts by the international community have unwittingly contributed to Somalia’s insecurity.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1945-4724
Print ISSN
1945-4716
Pages
pp. 121-132
Launched on MUSE
2016-07-12
Open Access
No
Archive Status
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