Abstract

Consideration of taxation policies and practices in locations often identified as “ungoverned spaces” leads to an important conclusion: classically “ungoverned spaces” frequently contain forms of taxation—of varying degrees of formality—outside the official state apparatus. This article uses examples of informal taxation and tax-like practices, particularly in the case of Nepal, to critically evaluate the definition and framing of “ungoverned spaces” in the modern age. It argues that although empirical evidence of non-government taxation practices remains limited, the fact that they occur at all raises implications for conventional understandings of political order and state building.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1945-4724
Print ISSN
1945-4716
Pages
pp. 39-46
Launched on MUSE
2016-07-12
Open Access
No
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