Abstract

Abstract:

This essay discusses Paradise’s exploration of utopia, and it attempts to argue that just as the novel ambitiously remembers the history of more than a century of American race and gender relations, its rethinking of “paradise” as a concept is interwoven with a political interrogation of the entire history of a traditional utopian social, spatial, and literary form. Moreover, this critique occurs at a historical juncture when that form has reached its absolute limits. Specifically, Paradise’s most urgent utopian undertaking is to push—and to expose—the limits of the notion of utopia as a world apart, an island unto itself.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1945-6182
Print ISSN
1062-4783
Pages
pp. 129-144
Launched on MUSE
2016-06-28
Open Access
No
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