Abstract

Abstract:

Richard Wright’s “The Man Who Lived Underground” resists narrative cohesion to a greater extent than do the majority of Wright’s other literary works. This paper proposes that applying the formal and critical techniques of film noir as a frame through which to process the novella facilitates a deeper analysis of Wright’s methods for illustrating the mechanisms of modern racialization. Reading the work through and against the framing devices of film noir also allows for an exploration of the author’s ways of theorizing (in)visibility and dispossession that trouble some of the universalizing tendencies of early film noir and humanist philosophical perspectives more broadly.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1945-6182
Print ISSN
1062-4783
Pages
pp. 111-127
Launched on MUSE
2016-06-28
Open Access
No
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