Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This paper examines the treatment of homosexuality in 21st-century Nigerian literature and discusses how the Nigerian literary community critiques discourses of homophobia and explores the everyday fears, desires, pleasures, and anxieties of those who experience same-sex attraction. It argues that 21st-century Nigerian writing can be seen as what Raymond Williams calls “emergent” because it resists the dominant discourses in ways not previously done before and tells diverse stories about same-sex desire that are neither monothematic nor moralistic. This article demonstrates how the work of authors such as Chris Abani, Chimamanda Adichie, and Jude Dibia as well as writing published on the Internet in the wake of the Same-Sex Marriage Prohibition Act tells queer stories about everyday life and love and the intersecting struggles queer African subjects must face.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2044
Print ISSN
0034-5210
Pages
pp. 139-161
Launched on MUSE
2016-07-01
Open Access
No
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