Abstract

This essay reexamines the literature and prints of the Paxton Boys’ 1764 pamphlet war using material culture as its lens. Specifically, by detailing how writers and illustrators narrated or depicted the physical appearance of those involved in this crisis—including how they dressed, the props they carried, and the things they pursued—this essay analyzes how objects became a visual shorthand with which to embody the ethnic or racial identities of various Pennsylvanians, to critique political opponents, and to persuade audiences. The ‘‘pamphlet war’’ was thus not just a war of words, images, or politics, but also one of material representations.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1559-0895
Print ISSN
1543-4273
Pages
pp. 348-376
Launched on MUSE
2016-06-14
Open Access
No
Archive Status
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