Abstract

Abstract:

Every act of censorship is also an act of iconoclasm. Together they constitute one of the oldest paradoxes of imagemaking and figuration. To make an image is both to want it and to fear it. The more it is desired, the more it seems contra naturam, and so is feared. It often has a vitality that is startlingly at odds with both its materiality and its concept. To parse individual episodes of censorship and iconoclasm is to uncover the roots of both the fear of images and the fear of art. But each of the many motives for censorship and iconoclasm testify, above all, to the impossibility of escaping it.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1944-768X
Print ISSN
0037-783X
Pages
pp. 67-99
Launched on MUSE
2016-06-15
Open Access
No
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