Abstract

Abstract:

Public perceptions and cinematic portrayals of Ghanaian passenger transportation vehicles and their drivers have undergone a massive transformation on film in the past fifty years. Colonial films depicted these vehicles as a symbol of modernity and drivers as cosmopolitan men, but contemporary Ghanaian popular culture portrays these vehicles and their drivers through a negative lens. This article uses ethnographic and archival data to explain why this shift occurred and its effects on the contemporary tro-tro industry. Portrayals of these vehicles have shifted because of a combination of historical, geographical, and social factors, including historical change, urbanization, proximity to corruption, the spread of HIV/AIDS, differences in rural settings, socioeconomic status, and perceptions of safety.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-1978
Print ISSN
0001-9887
Pages
pp. 44-64
Launched on MUSE
2016-06-10
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.