Abstract

Abstract:

Barbara Newhall Follett (1914–39?) was a prolific child author whose writings criss-crossed between the desires and expectations of children and adults alike. This article analyzes Follett’s travelogue, The Voyage of the Norman D. (1928), which records her trip on a lumber schooner. In an expansive form of “cross-writing,” the juvenile travel writer negotiates imagination and experience, influence and authority, self and self-representation. Follett blends fact and fiction in emulation of her literary models, manipulates and even upsets assumptions about childish inferiority, and performs piratical play. Most importantly, however, she documents travel’s power to validate a maturing writer’s own subjective experience.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-1201
Print ISSN
0885-0429
Pages
pp. 158-181
Launched on MUSE
2016-06-03
Open Access
No
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