Introduction: Canadian Tourism History

REFLECTING the fact that tourism has been the world’s fastest growing industry in recent decades, the relatively new field of tourism history is expanding rapidly.1 In doing so, it has moved well beyond the traditional top-down focus on major industrial and institutional players such as transcontinental railway companies and government agencies to examine topics such as “popular” (or non-elite) tourist practices, the role played by small-scale entrepreneurialism, tourism’s effects on rural areas and small towns, and its complicated environmental consequences. There is still no general history of tourism in Canada, however, and this is the first collection of articles dedicated to the subject.2 These articles originated with a workshop held in Vancouver in October 2014. It was funded by a SSHRC Connections grant as well as Simon Fraser University, with the assistance of the Network in Canadian History and Environment (NiCHE). Titled “Landscape, Nature, and Memory: Tourism History in Canada,” the workshop had a largely cultural and social focus, though every presentation reminded us that tourism is a business with a long economic history. The papers selected for this publication also demonstrate how tourism history now draws from other emergent fields including environmental history, commemoration studies, and mobility studies. This collection has a broad temporal and geographic range, and its themes include [End Page 235] nationalism and colonialism, private entrepreneurship and the economic role of the state, commemoration and the interpretation of history, travel narratives, promotional campaigns, photography, outdoor recreation, “automobility,” marine transportation, manufactured landscapes, race, and animal history.

The three overriding (and overlapping) themes, however, are landscape, nature, and memory, with each article exploring the relationship between complicated conditions “on the ground” and simplified or essentialized images of Canadian places and people. Thus, for the first theme, Tina Adcock and Jack Little examine the growing attraction of northern Canada’s “wilderness” landscapes, while Jenny Clayton’s main theme is the development and promotion of a scenic and recreational mountain landscape. Daniel Macfarlane examines the transformation of two “natural” landscapes into industrial landscapes, while Elizabeth Cavaliere focuses on the role of railways and photography in the making of nationally iconic sites (or sights), and Ben Bradley and Alan Gordon study very intentional constructions of historically themed landscapes. Nature is also an important theme in this collection, as, for example, in the contribution by Edward MacDonald and Alan MacEachern, which examines the promotion of ferry crossings to Prince Edward Island as miniature sea cruises, or in Susan Nance’s article on bucking horses as symbols of wildness in the Calgary Stampede. A major attraction of the Stampede, of course, was its close association with Alberta’s bygone frontier days, and memory is also a prominent theme in the articles by Gordon, Bradley, and especially Ian McKay, who examines the vexations of a professionally trained historian compelled to negotiate the new imperatives of “tourism/history” in Prince Edward Island. Collectively, these articles shed light on what Shelley Baranowski and Ellen Furlough refer to as “the grand narratives of modern history: class formation, nation building, economic development, and the emergence of consumer cultures.”3

The geographic distribution of this collection’s articles from coast to coast to coast reflects the rising interest in tourism history across the country, but the fact that some regions are more represented than others also reflects the difference in economic importance of tourism from province to province. Tiny Prince Edward Island is the focus of two articles, as is the high, sparsely populated mountain region of western Canada. The North is also well represented. As for central Canada, the lack of an article focusing exclusively on Quebec is unfortunate, given the historic importance of tourism in that province. However, both Quebec and Ontario are featured in Macfarlane’s article on the St. Lawrence–Niagara megaprojects, as well as in Cavaliere’s article on landscape photography, and Gordon’s article examines several of the pioneer village museums of Ontario, in addition to others in the country.

That the national focus of Gordon’s article is rather rare for Canadian tourism history is indicated by the monograph titles cited above (footnote 2).4 Tourism [End Page 236] promotion, after all, is largely a provincial and municipal responsibility, and Canada is too large a country for most tourists to visit in a single trip. It is hardly surprising, then, that historians have been captive to the same hierarchies of place that exist in the Canadian tourism imagination. It would be useful to know not only how Region A became imagined as exciting, appealing, and intriguing, but also how Region B became thought of as boring, empty, and deficient.5 While the Prairies are not generally considered to be a tourism mecca, recent works by Merle Massie and Dale Barbour show that both Saskatchewan and Manitoba had significant “internal” tourist activity, a category that has otherwise tended to be overlooked.6 If, as John Urry claims, tourism essentially involves visiting a place that has features distinguishing it from what is encountered in everyday life, then we need to question the tacit assumption that a person must travel across political (or social) boundaries in order to be considered a tourist.7 Christine Hudon’s research on railway pilgrimages to Catholic shrines in Quebec is a good example not only of “internal” tourism but of how plebeian tourism can be said to have begun considerably earlier than generally assumed.8

Despite the regional and local focus of most Canadian tourism history studies, urban tourism remains a neglected theme in this country.9 Another sorely neglected topic is the service side of the tourism industry, whether it be the role of wage labour, family labour, women, young people, or small businesses in what has traditionally been a seasonal industry. While there is a lot of literature on the socio-historical “construction” of successful, resilient tourist attractions such as Cavendish, Niagara Falls, and Banff, little has been written about the many tourist ventures that failed. The essays in this special collection, then, represent only a small sample of the themes that remain to be explored in this exciting and important new field of Canadian history. [End Page 237]

No description available
Click for larger view
View full resolution

Source: “Canada, Your Friendly Neighbor Invites You” (Ottawa: Canadian Travel Bureau, 1936). Illustration by Jack Bush.

Source : « Canada, Your Friendly Neighbor Invites You » (Ottawa, Office canadien du tourisme, 1936). Illustration de Jack Bush.

[End Page 238]

Introduction : L’histoire du tourisme au Canada

ILLUSTRATION du fait que le tourisme est l’industrie qui a connu la plus forte croissance dans le monde au cours des dernières décennies, l’histoire du tourisme — un champ relativement nouveau — prend rapidement de l’expansion1. Ce faisant, loin de se concentrer uniquement sur les principaux intervenants industriels et institutionnels comme les compagnies de chemin de fer transcontinentales et les organismes gouvernementaux et de les envisager de haut en bas comme autrefois, elle traite de sujets tels que les pratiques touristiques « populaires » (autres que celles de l’élite), le rôle joué par la petite entreprise, les effets du tourisme sur les régions rurales et les petites villes, et ses incidences environnementales complexes. Toutefois, il n’existe toujours pas d’histoire générale du tourisme au Canada, et le présent recueil d’articles est le premier à être consacré à ce sujet2. Ces articles tirent leur origine d’un atelier qui a eu lieu à Vancouver en octobre 2014, grâce à une subvention Connexion du Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines du Canada et à l’aide financière de l’Université Simon Fraser, avec l’appui de la Nouvelle initiative canadienne en histoire de l’environnement (NiCHE). Intitulé [End Page 239] « Landscape, Nature, and Memory: Tourism History in Canada », cet atelier a largement mis l’accent sur des aspects culturels et sociaux, même si chaque présentation nous a rappelé que le tourisme était un secteur d’activité doté d’une longue histoire économique. Les articles sélectionnés pour la présente publication montrent également comment l’histoire du tourisme fait maintenant appel à d’autres champs en émergence, entre autres à l’histoire de l’environnement, aux études sur la commémoration et à celles sur la mobilité. Ce recueil couvre un large éventail chronologique et géographique. Parmi les thèmes abordés figurent le nationalisme et le colonialisme, l’entrepreneuriat privé et le rôle économique de l’État, la commémoration et l’interprétation de l’histoire, les récits de voyage, les campagnes de publicité, la photographie, le plein air, l’« automobilité », les transports maritimes, les paysages fabriqués, la race et l’histoire des animaux.

Paysage, nature et mémoire sont cependant les trois thèmes prépondérants; il s’agit d’ailleurs de thèmes qui se recoupent, chaque article traitant des rapports entre des conditions complexes « sur le terrain » et des images simplifiées ou réduites à l’essentiel de lieux et de personnes du Canada. Ainsi, pour le premier thème, Tina Adcock et Jack Little analysent l’attrait croissant des paysages sauvages du nord du pays, tandis que Jenny Clayton aborde principalement la genèse et la promotion d’un paysage de montagne pittoresque et récréatif. Daniel Macfarlane étudie quant à lui la transformation de deux paysages « naturels » en paysages industriels, alors qu’Elizabeth Cavaliere se concentre sur le rôle des chemins de fer et de la photographie dans la fabrication de sites (ou d’attractions touristiques) emblématiques à l’échelle du pays. Ben Bradley et Alan Gordon s’intéressent pour leur part à des constructions très intentionnelles de paysages à thèmes historiques. La nature constitue également un thème important dans ce recueil, par exemple dans la contribution d’Edward MacDonald et Alan MacEachern, qui traite de la promotion de la traversée à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard présentée comme une mini-croisière maritime, ou dans l’article de Susan Nance sur les chevaux qui ruent, symboles d’une contrée sauvage au Stampede de Calgary. L’étroite association du Stampede avec un passé révolu — celui où l’Alberta était une frontière — représente évidemment une attraction majeure. La mémoire est également un thème important dans les articles de Gordon, de Bradley et surtout dans celui d’Ian McKay, qui se penche sur les vexations d’un historien professionnel obligé de négocier les nouveaux impératifs de l’« histoire pour touristes » à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard. Collectivement, ces articles jettent de la lumière sur ce que Shelley Baranowski et Ellen Furlough appellent « les grands récits de l’histoire contemporaine : la formation de classes, la construction de la nation, le développement économique et l’émergence de cultures de consommation3 ».

Si la distribution géographique des articles de ce recueil, de l’Atlantique au Pacifique en passant par l’Arctique, témoigne de l’intérêt grandissant pour l’histoire du tourisme d’un bout à l’autre du pays, le fait que certaines régions soient mieux représentées que d’autres reflète également la différence dans [End Page 240] l’importance économique du tourisme d’une province à l’autre. La toute petite Îledu-Prince-Édouard fait l’objet de deux articles, tout comme la région des hautes montagnes de l’Ouest canadien, une région au peuplement dispersé. Le Nord est bien représenté lui aussi. En ce qui concerne le Canada central, l’absence d’article traitant exclusivement du Québec est malheureuse, compte tenu de l’importance historique du tourisme dans cette province. Toutefois, le Québec et l’Ontario sont tous deux à l’honneur dans l’article de Macfarlane sur les mégaprojets du Saint-Laurent et de la Niagara ainsi que dans celui de Cavaliere sur la photographie de paysages. Quant à l’article de Gordon, il porte sur des musées consacrés à des villages de pionniers, dont plusieurs se trouvent en Ontario.

Les titres des monographies cités précédemment (note 2) révèlent que l’envergure pancanadienne de l’article de Gordon est plutôt rare en histoire du tourisme au Canada4. Après tout, la promotion du tourisme est largement de responsabilité provinciale et municipale, et le Canada est un pays trop vaste pour que la plupart des touristes le visitent en un seul et même voyage. Dans ces conditions, il n’est guère étonnant que les historiens aient été prisonniers des mêmes hiérarchies de lieux que celles qui existent dans la façon d’imaginer le tourisme canadien. Il serait utile de savoir non seulement comment on en est venu à imaginer la région A comme une région passionnante, attirante et intrigante, mais aussi comment il se fait que l’on perçoive la région B comme ennuyeuse, vide et déficiente5. Quoique les Prairies ne soient généralement pas considérées comme La Mecque du tourisme, les travaux récents de Merle Massie et de Dale Barbour montrent que la Saskatchewan et le Manitoba ont tous deux eu une importante activité touristique « interne », catégorie que, par ailleurs, on a eu tendance à négliger6. Si, comme le soutient John Urry, le tourisme consiste essentiellement à visiter un endroit doté de traits qui le distinguent de ceux que l’on trouve dans la vie de tous les jours, alors il nous faut remettre en question l’hypothèse implicite selon laquelle une personne doit traverser des frontières politiques (ou sociales) pour être considérée comme un touriste7. La recherche de Christine Hudon sur les pèlerinages en train à des sanctuaires catholiques du Québec n’est pas seulement un bon exemple de tourisme interne; elle montre en outre comment on peut dire [End Page 241] que le tourisme des classes populaires a commencé considérablement plus tôt que ce que l’on suppose généralement8.

En dépit de l’orientation régionale et locale de la plupart des études sur le tourisme au Canada, le tourisme urbain demeure un thème négligé dans ce pays9. Autre aspect cruellement négligé : le volet service de l’industrie touristique, qu’il s’agisse du rôle de la main-d’œuvre salariée, de la main-d’œuvre familiale, des femmes, des jeunes ou de la petite entreprise dans ce qui était par le passé une industrie saisonnière. Certes, on a beaucoup écrit sur la « construction » sociohistorique d’attractions touristiques résistantes, qui ont connu du succès, comme Cavendish, Niagara Falls et Banff, mais il ne s’est pas publié grand-chose au sujet des nombreux projets touristiques qui ont abouti à un échec. Les essais contenus dans ce recueil tout particulier ne représentent par conséquent qu’un faible échantillon des thèmes qui restent à aborder dans ce nouveau domaine de l’histoire canadienne passionnant et important.

[Traduction : André LaRose]

Ben Bradley and J. I. Little

Ben Bradley, Grant Notley Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History & Classics at the University of Alberta, and Jack Little, professor emeritus in the Department of History at Simon Fraser University, are the guest editors of this issue of Histoire sociale / Social History.

Ben Bradley, chercheur postdoctoral Grant Notley au Département d’histoire et d’études classiques de l’Université de l’Alberta, et Jack Little, professeur émérite au Département d’histoire de l’Université Simon Fraser, sont les rédacteurs invités pour la présente livraison d’Histoire sociale / Social History.

They thank the 20 presenters at the 2014 Canadian Tourism History workshop; Nicolas Kenny and Eryk Martin for helping to organize it; and especially Kevin James for offering feedback at the event. They also thank the two anonymous reviewers who generously agreed to review all of the articles contained herein.

Footnotes

1. The sub-discipline gained its first dedicated journal in 2009 with the founding of the UK-based Journal of Tourism History.

2. Important books on Canadian tourism and travel history include (in chronological order), E. J. Hart, The Selling of Canada: The CPR and the Beginnings of Canadian Tourism (Banff: Altitude, 1983); Ian McKay, The Quest of the Folk: Antimodernism and Cultural Selection in Twentieth-Century Nova Scotia (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1994); Patricia Jasen, Wild Things: Nature, Culture, and Tourism in Ontario, 1790–1914 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1995); James Overton, Making a World of Difference: Essays on Tourism, Culture and Development in Newfoundland (St. John’s, NL: ISER, 1996); Karen Dubinsky, The Second Greatest Disappointment: Honeymooning and Tourism at Niagara Falls (Toronto: Between the Lines, 1999); Michael Dawson, Selling British Columbia: Tourism and Consumer Culture, 1890–1970 (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2004); Greg Gillespie, Hunting for Empire: Narratives of Sport in Rupert’s Land, 1840–70 (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2007); Cecilia Morgan, “A Happy Holiday”: English Canadians and Transatlantic Tourism, 1870–1930 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2008); Ian McKay and Robin Bates, In the Province of History: The Making of the Public Past in Twentieth-Century Nova Scotia (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2010); Faye Hammill and Michelle Smith, Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture: Canadian Periodicals in English and French, 1925–1960 (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2015).

3. Introduction to Shelley Baranowski and Ellen Furlough, eds., Being Elsewhere: Tourism, Consumer Culture, and Identity in Modern Europe and North America (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2004), p. 21.

4. Articles with a cross-country focus include Kevin Flynn, “Destination Nation: Nineteenth-Century Travels Aboard the Canadian Pacific Railway,” Essays on Canadian Writing, vol. 67 (Spring 1999), pp. 190–222; Karen Dubinsky, “‘Everybody Likes Canadians’: Canadians, Americans, and the Post-World War II Travel Boom” in Baranowski and Furlough, eds., Being Elsewhere, pp. 320–347; J. I. Little, “A Country Without a Soul: Rupert Brooke’s Gothic Vision of Canada,” Canadian Literature, vol. 219 (Winter 2013), pp. 95–111.

5. On the process whereby one section of the Canadian Rockies was deemed inadequate for promotion to tourists, see Ben Bradley, “‘A Questionable Basis for Establishing a Major Park’: Politics, Roads, and the Failure of a National Park in British Columbia’s Big Bend Country” in Claire E. Campbell, ed., A Century of Parks Canada, 1911–2011 (Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2011), pp. 79–102.

6. Dale Barbour, Winnipeg Beach: Leisure and Courtship in a Resort Town, 1900–1967 (Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2011); Merle Massie, Forest Prairie Edge: Place History in Saskatchewan (Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2014), chap. 7. Also see Bill Waiser, Saskatchewan’s Playground: A History of Prince Albert National Park (Saskatoon: Fifth House, 1989).

7. John Urry, The Tourist Gaze: Leisure and Travel in Contemporary Societies (London: Sage, 1990), p. 11.

8. Christine Hudon, “La sociabilité religieuse à l’ère du vapeur du rail,” Journal of the Canadian Historical Association, New series, vol. 10 (1999), pp. 129–147. On early plebeian tourism, see also J. I. Little, “Scenic Tourism on the Northeastern Borderland: Lake Memphremagog’s Steamboat Excursions and Resort Hotels, 1850–1900,” Journal of Historical Geography, vol. 35, no. 4 (2009), pp. 716–742.

9. Nineteenth-century Quebec City remains a major exception, though largely from the perspective of travellers’ narratives and tourist guidebooks. See, for example, Alan Gordon, “‘Where Famous Heroes Fell’: Tourism, History, and Liberalism in Old Quebec” in Phillip Buckner and John G. Reid, eds., Remembering 1759: The Conquest of Canada in Historical Memory (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012), pp. 58–81; and J. I. Little, “‘Like a fragment of the old world’: The Historical Regression of Quebec City in Travel Narratives and Tourist Guidebooks, 1776–1913,” Urban History Review, vol. 40, no. 2 (Spring 2012), pp. 15–28.

Tous deux remercient les 20 présentateurs à l’atelier de 2014 sur l’histoire du tourisme au Canada; Nicolas Kenny et Eryk Martin, qui ont contribué à son organisation; et surtout Kevin James, qui a fait part de ses commentaires au cours de cette activité. Ils expriment également leur gratitude envers les deux évaluateurs qui ont généreusement consenti à examiner l’ensemble des articles contenus dans ce numéro.

Footnotes

1. La sous-discipline a obtenu sa première revue spécialisée en 2009 par suite de la fondation du Journal of Tourism History, une revue britannique.

2. Les ouvrages importants sur l’histoire du tourisme et des déplacements au Canada sont (par ordre chronologique) : E. J. Hart, The Selling of Canada: The CPR and the Beginnings of Canadian Tourism, Banff, Altitude, 1983; Ian McKay, The Quest of the Folk: Antimodernism and Cultural Selection in Twentieth-Century Nova Scotia, Montréal et Kingston, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1994; Patricia Jasen, Wild Things: Nature, Culture, and Tourism in Ontario, 1790–1914, Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 1995; James Overton, Making a World of Difference: Essays on Tourism, Culture and Development in Newfoundland, St. John’s (T.-N.-L.), ISER, 1996; Karen Dubinsky, The Second Greatest Disappointment: Honeymooning and Tourism at Niagara Falls, Toronto, Between the Lines, 1999; Michael Dawson, Selling British Columbia: Tourism and Consumer Culture, 1890–1970, Vancouver, University of British Columbia Press, 2004; Greg Gillespie, Hunting for Empire: Narratives of Sport in Rupert’s Land, 1840–70, Vancouver, University of British Columbia Press, 2007; Cecilia Morgan, “A Happy Holiday”: English Canadians and Transatlantic Tourism, 1870–1930, Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 2008; Ian McKay et Robin Bates, In the Province of History: The Making of the Public Past in Twentieth-Century Nova Scotia, Montreal et Kingston, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2010; Faye Hammill et Michelle Smith, Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture: Canadian Periodicals in English and French, 1925–1960, Edmonton, University of Alberta Press, 2015.

3. Introduction à Shelley Baranowski et Ellen Furlough (dir.), Being Elsewhere: Tourism, Consumer Culture, and Identity in Modern Europe and North America, Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2004, p. 21.

4. Parmi les articles d’intérêt pancanadien, mentionnons ceux de Kevin Flynn, « Destination Nation: Nineteenth-Century Travels Aboard the Canadian Pacific Railway », Essays on Canadian Writing, vol. 67 (printemps 1999), p. 190–222; de Karen Dubinsky, « ‘Everybody Likes Canadians’: Canadians, Americans, and the Post-World War II Travel Boom » dans Baranowski et Furlough (dir.), Being Elsewhere, p. 320–347; et de J. I. Little, « A Country Without a Soul: Rupert Brooke’s Gothic Vision of Canada », Canadian Literature, vol. 219 (hiver 2013), p. 95–111.

5. Sur le processus par lequel une section des Rocheuses canadiennes a été jugée inadéquate pour être promue auprès des touristes, voir Ben Bradley, « ‘A Questionable Basis for Establishing a Major Park’: Politics, Roads, and the Failure of a National Park in British Columbia’s Big Bend Country » dans Claire E. Campbell (dir.), A Century of Parks Canada, 1911–2011, Calgary, University of Calgary Press, 2011, p. 79–102.

6. Dale Barbour, Winnipeg Beach: Leisure and Courtship in a Resort Town, 1900–1967, Winnipeg, University of Manitoba Press, 2011; Merle Massie, Forest Prairie Edge: Place History in Saskatchewan, Winnipeg, University of Manitoba Press, 2014, chap. 7. Voir aussi Bill Waiser, Saskatchewan’s Playground: A History of Prince Albert National Park, Saskatoon, Fifth House, 1989.

7. John Urry, The Tourist Gaze: Leisure and Travel in Contemporary Societies, Londres, Sage, 1990, p. 11.

8. Christine Hudon, « La sociabilité religieuse à l’ère du vapeur et du rail », Revue de la Société historique du Canada, nouvelle série, vol. 10 (1999), p. 129–147. Sur les débuts du tourisme dans les classes populaires, voir aussi J. I. Little, « Scenic Tourism on the Northeastern Borderland: Lake Memphremagog’s Steamboat Excursions and Resort Hotels, 1850–1900 », Journal of Historical Geography, vol. 35, no 4 (2009), p. 716–742.

9. La ville de Québec du XIXe siècle demeure une exception notable, mais ce, largement du point de vue des récits de voyageurs et des guides touristiques. Voir par exemple Alan Gordon, « ‘Where Famous Heroes Fell’: Tourism, History, and Liberalism in Old Quebec », dans Phillip Buckner et John G. Reid (dir.), Remembering 1759: The Conquest of Canada in Historical Memory, Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 2012, p. 58–81; et J. I. Little, « ‘Like a fragment of the old world’: The Historical Regression of Quebec City in Travel Narratives and Tourist Guidebooks, 1776–1913 », Revue d’histoire urbaine, vol. 40, no 2 (printemps 2012), p. 15–28. [End Page 242]

Additional Information

ISSN
1918-6576
Print ISSN
0018-2257
Pages
235-242
Launched on MUSE
2016-05-20
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.