Abstract

Ian McEwan’s use of Fordian elements and techniques in his novella On Chesil Beach — specifically allusions to The Good Soldier; impressionism as an epistemological and narrative strategy; and elements of narrative discourse such as perspective, time, and order — direct our attention to the narrativization of intimacy, what is sayable and unsayable in the representation of intimacy, and to what kinds of knowledge narrative provides access. These moves teach us a form of ethical reading generated by the thinking of Emmanuel Levinas: how to navigate McEwan’s representation of desire, intimacy, and alterity in order to recognize the epistemological and ethical commitments and problems engendered by narrative.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 89-104
Launched on MUSE
2016-04-08
Open Access
No
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