Abstract

In this essay, I argue that the cliff-hanger excitement of sensation fiction may be overstated, and thus we should consider other affective ways that installments could draw readers back to the periodical in which they were published. After analyzing the use of suspense at the end of installments in Gaskell’s A Dark Night’s Work (1863) and Braddon’s Eleanor’s Victory (1863), I contend that sympathy constitutes a large part of the affective experience of reading serialized sensation novels, slowing down the pace of what has been thought of as a very fast genre.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1712-526X
Print ISSN
0709-4698
Pages
pp. 149-170
Launched on MUSE
2016-04-04
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.