Abstract

Recognition of social forces (racism, privilege, power) to the extent that is required by critical race theory (CRT) results in a paradigm shift in the way that we theorize and research student development, specifically self-authorship. This paradigm shift moves the center of analysis from individual, to the individual in relation to her political, racialized, environment, which then provides a new vantage point to capture additional developmental processes. In this article, each dimension of self-authorship is reconsidered with revised questions that seek to examine the ways that race/ethnicity, racism, and power influence the self-authoring process.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-3382
Print ISSN
0897-5264
Pages
pp. 168-180
Launched on MUSE
2016-03-29
Open Access
No
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