Abstract

In 2010 Russia and Norway signed a treaty that ended a 40-year dispute by dividing territory in the Barents Sea. Why did this case end in a cooperative agreement rather than continue an on-going dispute? This article examines a number of possible explanations at the international, bilateral, and domestic politics levels to answer this question. Ultimately, it concludes that the 2010 Norway-Russia boundary delimitation agreement succeeded because both sides had a strong economic interest in it, benefitted from the use of international law, had a history of working together at the bilateral level, and were able to manage adroitly the impact of business-state relations and identity politics on the issue.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2165-0659
Print ISSN
2166-4307
Pages
pp. 75-96
Launched on MUSE
2016-03-24
Open Access
No
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