Abstract

This paper introduces the Ṣāliḥiyyah school in Qazvīn, an innovative religious school founded in nineteenth-century Iran which taught both religious as well as academic subjects. Relying on memoirs by the descendants of its founder, Mullā Muḥammad Ṣāliḥ Baraghānī, it traces the pivotal role of this seminary in Iranian religious and political affairs, as well as renowned graduates from this school, both male and female. It situates the school in the greater Shiʿi pre-modern debate between Uṣūlism versus Akhbārism, as well as the emerging Bābī movement, and shows how one of the great contemporary Muslim reformers, Sayyid Jamāl al-Dīn Asadābādī, was a direct product of this school.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2051-557X
Print ISSN
1748-9423
Pages
pp. 449-472
Launched on MUSE
2016-03-15
Open Access
No
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