Abstract

Marginalized borderlanders on Tsushima Island now celebrate histories that have been long silenced by Japanese nationalist discourse. Although the emerging alternative past appears to embody regional postcolonial defiance, this ethnographic investigation reveals the complicated, multilayered meanings of an annual festival situated at the crossroads of three interrelated cultural spaces: Japan’s postcolonial global modernity, Tsushima islanders’ racialized border identity, and dislocated emigrants’ creative imagining of the homeland. The paper will investigate this festival’s cultural performance as a touchstone for ideological diversity and social agency. I argue that the cultural performance simultaneously engenders local ideological unrest and new cultural possibilities, and in turn ignites the genesis of new border identities.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1543-0413
Print ISSN
0737-7037
Pages
pp. 1-39
Launched on MUSE
2016-03-04
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.