Abstract

This article analyzes Malcolm Saville’s popular mid-twentieth-century Lone Pine series, reflecting on what is at stake in Saville’s attempts to secure a mixed-gender readership by tempering the boy’s-own-adventure trappings of the stories with a quieter attentiveness to emotional nuance. It charts the precarious balancing act involved in the representation of adolescent desire for a pre-adolescent readership, examining how Saville’s novels sought to satisfy the demands of the erotic within a form (children’s adventure-story series fiction) that cannot accommodate the gratification of desire, or at least can accommodate it only as a finale.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-1201
Print ISSN
0885-0429
Pages
pp. 41-58
Launched on MUSE
2016-02-29
Open Access
No
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