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  • Contributors

sacha e. davis (sacha.davis@newcastle.edu.au) received his PhD in history from the University of New South Wales, and lectures in modern history at the University of Newcastle (Australia). His work has appeared in Central Europe, History of the Family, the Zeitschrift für Siebenbürgische Landeskunde, and a number of edited works.

sabina groeneveld (Sabina.Groeneveld@uts.edu.au) is a lecturer in International Studies at the University of Technology, Sydney. Her research interests include various areas of German literature, postcolonial studies, and human-animal studies. Her doctoral research analyzed private texts generated in Qingdao, China, by German colonists during 1897–1914 focusing on the construction of colonial roles.

dani kranz (dani@danikranz.com) is Associate Professor of Sociology and Empirical Research Methods at the Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences. She publishes across her areas of interest on topics as diverse as state-assisted return migration programs (with Nir Cohen), ideas of home and homelessness amongst third-generation Jews who grew up in Germany (2015), and intercouples in Israel (2015).

alexander maxwell (alexander.maxwell@vuw.ac.nz) is Senior Lecturer in History at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand and director of the Antipodean East European Study Group. He is the author of Choosing Slovakia and Patriots Against Fashion. He has published several articles on national awakening in eastern Europe, nationalism theory, and history pedagogy.

katharina isabel schmidt (katharina.i.schmidt@yale.edu) is a JSD candidate in law at the Yale Law School and a PhD student in history at Princeton University. In addition to modern German and American legal thought, she is writing on transnational intellectual history as well as on social, political, and legal theory.

christian wilbers (cawilbers@email.wm.edu) received his MA in English from the University of Münster and his PhD in American Studies from the College of William and Mary in Spring 2016. His dissertation explores transnational aspects of German-American life in the 1920s and 1930s. [End Page 221]

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Additional Information

ISSN
2164-8646
Print ISSN
0149-7952
Pages
p. 221
Launched on MUSE
2016-02-22
Open Access
No
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