In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

Fig. 8. Mamoru Sato, 'Scope 89-4, aluminum and stainless steel, 43/4 x 201 / 2 x 17J,.1 in, 1989. NOSEWAZOO Jim Pallas, 1311 Bishop, Gross Pointe, MI 48230, U.S.A. Received 3July 1990. Acceptedfor publication bylWgerF. Malina. NoseWazoo (Fig. 7) is an electronic creature, 5-ft tall, that responds to the environment. Utilizing pneumatic cylinders , he (many of my pieces assume gender) is able to flex his neck and to extend his nose 20 in. Since his torso is suspended in a gimbal, these actions displace his center of gravity, thus enabling him to rock back and forth and flip over. He sees his surroundings with four crude eyes and an infrared motion detector. He senses his own orientation with internal mercury switches. All this information is sent to his mind, a 6502 microprocessor located in his foot. The machine language program for the behavior of NoseWazoo is the result of a collaboration between myself and software engineerJim Zalewski of Datafast Company. The program is 'burned' into a programmable read-only memory (PROM) integrated circuit. With this PROM chip installed, NoseWazoo seeks to encourage visitor interaction. He becomes active when visitors approach, and as they move in front of him, he tries to nudge them with his cushioned nose. He is able to kink his neck, inverting his posture. He can recover from this position only by rocking with his nose. A velcro nose Fig. 7. Jim Pallas, NoseWawo, painted welded steel, pneumatics, electronics, epoxy, sisal fibers, beads and tar, 58 x 38 x 65 in, 60 Ib, 1990. (Photo: Courtesy ofAllan Stone Gallery, New York) mask allows him to snatch targets. His nose and neck can be operated directly by a remote hand-held joystick. The surface of his body is decorated with sisal fibers, epoxy-embedded beads, wires and other materials. 'SCAPE Mamoru Sato, Department ofArt, College ofArts and Humanities, 2535 The Mall, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, U.S.A. Received 7 March 1990. Acceptedfor publication bylWgerF. Malina. From nature to art, my 'Scope series finds its inspiration in the fluid and progressive aspect of movement in our environment. Certain multiple forms in nature, such as stalks of wheat or ocean waves, become kinetic abstractions moved into action. The form of individual elements and the method of instigating their movement combine to give each sculpture its own unique character. Certain features are prominent in my most recent 'Scope series. Although I have created some motorized pieces, I prefer those that are activated by touch or wind, sources of movement in the environment. Touch also involves the actual participation of the viewer with the pieces, thus creating a greater aura of intimacy . In addition, wind and touch have the added benefit of nondependency on an artificial energy source. Abstracts 83 ...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1530-9282
Print ISSN
0024-094X
Pages
p. 83
Launched on MUSE
2017-01-04
Open Access
No
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