Abstract

Through sixty in-depth interviews conducted with immigrant Filipino Navy families in San Diego, California between 2004 and 2005, I examine how the U.S. military, as a colonial institution, transformed conceptions of race, gender, and family and reconfigured these structures by regulating and authorizing certain notions of intimacy, marriage, motherhood/fatherhood, and family life based on an ideal of white bourgeois domesticity. I argue that the family construct that promotes social and cultural citizenship for Filipino Navy families can potentially destabilize the U.S. military institution.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2326-0947
Print ISSN
2326-0939
Pages
pp. 190-208
Launched on MUSE
2015-11-21
Open Access
No
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