Abstract

This paper examines the persistence of violent conflicts in the two Sudans. It examines standard macro-approaches to conflict resolution—democracy, inclusiveness, intervention, secession, as well as the more radical “let-them-fight” thesis—to demonstrate the limitations on the ability of outsiders to manage the conflicts. It concludes that relying on these approaches alone is not likely to lead to meaningful and lasting conflict resolution. The causes of Sudan’s and South Sudan’s wars run deeper than a failure to be inclusive and are instead connected to the nature of the state in Africa.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2156-7263
Print ISSN
2156-695X
Pages
pp. 143-158
Launched on MUSE
2015-11-14
Open Access
No
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