Abstract

This essay examines the extended debate between Henry James and H. G. Wells through the lens of Fredric Jameson’s voluminous writings on literature, the novel, and narrative more generally. Reading the exchange in terms other than those of a dominant ethical ideology casts new light on the very different projects executed on each side of the divide: the divide between James and Wells but also, as James Woods’s recent review of David Mitchell’s fiction makes evident, between what remains a still active distinction between the novel and storytelling, “high” and “low” fiction, and, ultimately, art and culture.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 267-279
Launched on MUSE
2015-11-11
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.