Abstract

In 1927 Virginia Woolf reviewed Ernest Hemingway’s Men without Women for the Sunday Books supplement of the New York Herald Tribune. Woolf envisioned her review as a conversation with the author to help him or her improve future work—a cultural conversation, to use Patrick Collier’s term. By publishing in the Herald Tribune, she wrote for a venue popular with American expatriates, one Hemingway and his friends were likely to read. Perhaps as a result of the review, both Hemingway and Woolf began to develop their own aesthetics, in Death in the Afternoon and A Room of One’s Own, respectively.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2152-9272
Print ISSN
1947-6574
Pages
pp. 44-59
Launched on MUSE
2015-11-02
Open Access
No
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