Abstract

Literature can inform our philosophical contemplations on grief in multiple ways. Here, I explore grief through reflecting on particular literary examples from C. S. Lewis and Christopher Reid respectively. Resisting temptations to offer a general definition, I suggest that much of what many of us do in relation to the dead does not stand in need of instrumental explanation. Grief is typically embodied in behavior, not hidden behind it. Such behavior may include kissing photographs and speaking to the deceased, and may be understood by some to indicate a desire for renewed intimacy. It patterns the life of the griever, with many different variations.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 154-171
Launched on MUSE
2015-09-30
Open Access
No
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