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  • Contributors

CLAUDIA BÖHME is an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Trier, Germany. She received her PhD in anthropology from the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz in 2012. Her areas of research are African cinema and media cultures in Tanzania and East Africa. Her book on the video film industry in Tanzania is forthcoming in the Mainzer Beiträge zur Afrikaforschung with Rüdiger Köppe Verlag Köln. Her work appears in the edited volumes Listening to Africa: Anglophone Literatures and Cultures (winter, 2012), Genre Hybridization: Global Cinematic Flows (Schüren, 2013), Global Nollywood (Indiana University Press, 2013), Bongo Media Worlds (Köppe, 2014), Trance Mediums and New Media (Fordham University Press, 2014), and Cultural Entrepreneurship in Africa (Routledge, 2015). She is one of the editors of the online journal Swahili Forum. She may be contacted by e-mail at claudia.boehme@uni-leipzig.de.

JEAN DANGLER is an associate professor of medieval Iberian studies at Tulane University. She received her PhD in Spanish from Emory University in 1997. Her book Mediating Fictions: Literature, Women Healers, and the Go-Between in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia (Bucknell University Press, 2001) analyzes late medieval literary works that bolstered the marginalization of women healers from traditional healing practice, while Making Difference in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia (University of Notre Dame Press, 2005) examines the ways that difference was made between people in medieval and early modern Iberian lyrics, medical treatises, and discourses on the monster. Her next book, Edging toward Iberia, currently under review, proposes more capacious conceptual models of medieval Iberia and broader ways to carry out research in nonmodern periods. Her other areas of investigation include Andalusi lyric, especially the works of Ibn Quzmān, and gender, sexuality, and the body in late medieval Catalan literatures. She may be contacted by e-mail at jdangler@tulane.edu.

CORRIE DECKER is an assistant professor of history at the University of California, Davis. She received her PhD in African history from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2007. Her book, Mobilizing Zanzibari Women: The Struggle for Respectability and Self-Reliance (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) investigates the history of Muslim women’s education and professionalization in the Zanzibar Islands during the first half of the twentieth century. Her work has appeared in Past & Present, the International Journal of African Historical Studies, and the Journal of Women’s History, and in edited volumes on marriage and sexuality on the Swahili Coast and on the history of girlhood. She is currently researching the reformulation of custom [End Page 112] and institutions that govern youth in colonial and postcolonial East Africa. She may be contacted by e-mail at crdecker@ucdavis.edu.

ELISABETH McMAHON is an associate professor of history at Tulane University. She received her PhD in African history from Indiana University. She is the author of Slavery and Emancipation in Islamic East Africa: From Honor to Respectability (Cambridge University Press, 2013). Her work appears in the Journal of Women’s History, the Women’s History Review, the International Journal of African Historical Studies, the Journal of Social History, and edited volumes published by Cambridge University Press and Ohio University Press. Her current research projects include a study of emotions on the Swahili coast during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and the history of model villages as a development tool across the African continent from 1850 to the present. She may be contacted by e-mail at emcmahon@tulane.edu.

KATHRYN A. RHINE is an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Kansas. She received her PhD in anthropology from Brown University in 2010. She is the coeditor of a volume entitled Medical Anthropology in Global Africa (University of Kansas Publications in Anthropology, 2014) and has published articles in Ethnos (2014) and Anthropological Quarterly (2009). She is currently completing a book manuscript titled The Unseen Things: HIV, Secrecy, and Well-Being among Women in Northern Nigeria. Her research interests include medical anthropology, global health, gender, sexuality, and kinship in Nigeria. She may be contacted by e-mail at krhine@ku.edu. [End Page 113]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-1978
Print ISSN
0001-9887
Pages
pp. 112-113
Launched on MUSE
2015-10-01
Open Access
No
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