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Daniel Fischlin, ed. OuterSpeares: Shakespeare, Intermedia, and the Limits of Adaptation. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014. Pp. xii + 401. $80.00 cloth, $34.95 paper.

This volume begins with a list of illustrations (ix–x), acknowledgments (xi–xii), and an introduction by the editor (3–52). The primary text includes essays in four parts. Part 1, “‘Strange Invention’: Shakespeare in the New Media,” includes: Christy Desmet, “YouTube Shakespeare, Appropriation, and Rhetorics of Invention” (53–74); Jennifer L. Ailles, “‘Is There an App for That?’: Mobile Shakespeare on the Phone and in the Cloud” (75–114). Part 2, “‘These Violent Delights Have Violent Ends’: Shakespearean Adaptations and Film Intermedia,” includes: Don Moore, “Melted into Media: Reading Julie Taymor’s Film Adaptation of The Tempest in the Wake of 9/11 and the War on Terror” (115–51); Daniel Fischlin, Tom Magill, and Jessica Riley, “Transgression and Transformation: Mickey B and the Dramaturgy of Adaptation: An Interview with Tom Magill” (152–204). Part 3, “‘All the Uses of This World’: TV, Radio, Popular Music, Theatre, and the Uses of Intermedia,” includes: Kim Fedderson and J. Michael Richardson, “Slings and Arrows: An Intermediated Shakespearean Adaptation” (205–29); Andrew Bretz, “Your Master’s Voice: The Shakespearean Narrator as Intermedial Authority on 1930s American Radio” (230–56); Daniel Fischlin, “Sounding Shakespeare: Intermedial Adaptation and Popular Music” (257–89); James McKinnon, “‘Playing the Race Bard’: How Shakespeare and Harlem Duet Sold (at) the 2006 Stratford Shakespeare Festival” (290–320). Part 4, “‘Give No Limits to My Tongue…I Am Privileged to Speak’: The Limits of Adaptation?,” includes: Monika Smialkowska, “Patchwork Shakespeare: Community Events at the American Shakespeare Tercentenary (1916)” (321–46); Sujata Iyengar, “Upcycling Shakespeare: Crafting Cultural Capital” (347–71); Mark Fortier, “Beyond Adaptation” (372–86). The text concludes with contributors (387–92) and an index (393–401). [End Page 251]

Eileen Kearney and Charlotte Headrick, eds. Irish Women Dramatists, 1908–2001. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2014. Pp. xi + 343. $34.95.

This volume begins with acknowledgments (ix–x), credits and performance rights (xi), and an introduction by the editors (1–28). The primary text includes the following plays: The Workhouse Ward (1908), by Lady Augusta Gregory (29–40); The King of Spain’s Daughter (1935), by Teresa Deevy (41–58); I Do Like to Be Beside the Seaside (1984), by Anne Le Marquand Hartigan (59–104); The Stranded Hours Between (1989), by Dolores Walshe (105–70); Eclipsed (1992), by Patricia Burke Brogan (171–230); Twinkletoes (1993), by Jennifer Johnston (231–50); Heritage (2001), by Nicola McCartney (251–343).

Tomaž Onič, ed. Harold Pinter on International Stages. Frankfurt: Peter Lang Edition, 2014. Pp. 213. $60.95.

This volume begins with acknowledgments (7–8) and a preface by the editor (9–14). The primary text includes essays in four parts. Part 1, “Pinter in the UK,” includes: Mark Taylor-Batty, “The Company of Men: Pinter’s Gendered Conflict” (17–28). Part 2, “Pinter in Italy,” includes: Nick Ceramella, “‘Silence Symphony’ Conducted by Pinter and Eduardo, Two World Theatre Maestri” (31–52); Pia Vittoria Colombo, “The Italian Anatomy of Pinter: With their Pinter’s Anatomy, Italian Contemporary Playwrights ricci/forte Pay Their Dues to the British Nobel Laureate” (53–66); Eve Marine Dauvergne, “An International Approach to A Slight Ache” (67–74). Part 3, “Pinter Further East,” includes: Tomaž Onič, “Early Productions of Pinter on the Slovene Stage” (77–88); Acija Alfirević, “Harold Pinter’s Reception in Croatia” (89–102); Benjamin Keatinge, “Pinter in Macedonia: Productions, Translations and Critical Reception” (103–18); Andrea P. Balogh, “Harold’s Pinter’s Authorial Image: Negotiating between the West and Hungary” (119–40); Anna Suwalska-Kołecka, “Rediscovering Pinter—a few comments on the most recent Polish productions of Pinter’s plays” (141–52); Nursen Gomceli, “Harold Pinter’s ‘Room’ on Turkish Stages: a ‘Dilemma’ between Art and Politics?” (153–66). Part 4, “Pinter across the Atlantic,” includes: Susan Hollis Merritt, “Being and Not Being Harold Pinter: Pinter Still in Play in the USA” (169–204). The volume concludes with an index (205–13).

Michele Marrapodi, ed. Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition. Farnham: Ashgate, 2014. Pp. xiii + 373. $129.95.

This volume begins with a list...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1936-1637
Print ISSN
0010-4078
Pages
pp. 251-254
Launched on MUSE
2015-09-26
Open Access
No
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