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  • Contributors

Roy Doron is Assistant Professor of History at Winston-Salem State University. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin and his B.A. from the University of Washington in Seattle. He is the author, with Toyin Falola, of a forthcoming biography of Ken Saro-Wiwa from Ohio University Press as well as several journal articles, book chapters and encyclopedia articles on the Nigerian Civil War. His main research centers on the military and political history of the Nigerian Civil War, and addresses issues of identity formation, memory, and state-society relations. dorons@wssu.edu

Daniel Hershenzon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages at the University of Connecticut. He is completing a book manuscript titled Early Modern Spain and the Mediterranean: Captivity, Commerce, and Communication. The book explores the entangled histories of Spain, Morocco and Ottoman Algiers, arguing that ransom mechanisms associated with the captivity of Christians and Muslims conditioned the formation of the Mediterranean as a socially, politically, and economically integrated region. daniel.hershenszon@uconn.edu

Jennifer Lofkrantz is Visiting Assistant Professor in African and Islamic World History at SUNY-Geneseo. She is the editor of this special issue of African Economic History as well as being a co-editor of African Economic History. She is the author of several articles and book chapters on ransoming in precolonial West Africa. She holds a Ph.D. in African History from York University, Toronto. lofkrantz@geneseo.edu

Amy Niang is Assistant Professor in International Relations at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. Her research is broadly motivated by an interest in the history of state formation and related ideas of sovereignty, statehood, and community; the history of Africa’s international relations; and geopolitical processes in the Sahel. She has a Ph.D. in Politics and International Relations from the University of Edinburgh, UK and a Masters in Political Economy from the University of Tsukuba, Japan. amy.niang@wits.ac.za [End Page 239]

Akachi Odoemene is an Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Postdoctoral Research Fellow (2013-2015) at the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. His research focuses on African Social History, Peace and Conflict Research, Ethnic Studies and Development Studies. He was a Hewlett Scholar at Brown University (2012), and a 2009 African Humanities Program (AHP) Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS), amongst many other awards. He holds a Ph.D. in African History from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. akaigolo@yahoo.com

Olatunji Ojo is Associate Professor of History at Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario. He is the co-editor (with Nadine Hunt) of Slavery in Africa and the Caribbean: A History of Enslavement and Identity Since the 18th Century (London: I.B. Tauris, 2012). He is the author of numerous articles and book chapters on identity, financial transactions, slavery, gender, rituals, and the African Diaspora. He is an associate editor with the African Origins Database, Emory University, Atlanta, and is currently researching the politics of identity in precolonial Yorubaland. oojo@brocku.ca

Suzanne Schwarz is Professor of History at the University of Worcester, and an Honorary Fellow of the Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation at the University of Hull. She was an external consultant for the development of the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool in 2007, and is currently a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, a member of Council of the Hakluyt Society, and Committee Secretary of Fontes Historiae Africanae. s.scwharz@worc.ac.uk

Gillian Weiss is an Associate Professor of History at Case Western Reserve University. A scholar of France and the Mediterranean world during the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, she is the author of Captives and Corsairs: France and Slavery in the Early Modern Mediterranean (Stanford University Press, 2011), translated into French (Editions Anacharsis, 2014), as well as articles published in French Historical Studies, Slavery & Abolition and L’Esprit Créateur, among other journals. She recently co-edited a special issue of French History with Megan Armstrong on “France and the Early Modern Mediterranean” and is currently writing a book about North African slaves in France during the reign of Louis XIV entitled Slavery...

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Additional Information

ISSN
2163-9108
Print ISSN
0145-2258
Pages
pp. 239-241
Launched on MUSE
2015-09-18
Open Access
No
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