Abstract

Toril Moi shows that Wittgenstein’s philosophy, and particularly his critique of the “craving for generality” transforms our understanding of concept, and theory. By teaching us how to think through examples, ordinary language philosophy releases us from the grip of the logic of representation—the logic of inclusion/exclusion—that dominates feminist theory today. Taking her examples mostly from intersectionality theory, Moi shows that ordinary language philosophy offers a powerful alternative to contemporary identity and anti-identity theories, and that this philosophy is more attentive to particulars, better capable of helping to make sense of women’s experiences than the standard attempts to “do theory.”

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-661X
Print ISSN
0028-6087
Pages
pp. 191-216
Launched on MUSE
2015-08-24
Open Access
No
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