Abstract

The Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, from its very inception, attracted visionaries, exiles, pacifists, and warriors—often united only by their suspicion of an overly assertive government. Over the course of the past four centuries, the Mid-Atlantic engendered melting-pot politics and a spirit of private initiative—allowing for partnerships with government when necessary. The middle of the Eastern Seaboard ultimately influenced the political culture of the middle of America—helping to bind the North together during the Civil War, laying the foundation for the New Deal, and continuing to influence national elections through the twenty-first century.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2153-2109
Print ISSN
0031-4528
Pages
pp. 300-313
Launched on MUSE
2015-08-10
Open Access
No
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