Abstract

Resistance to digital technology in manuscript study stems in large part from what detractors perceive as a loss of contact with the material artifact. For them, the digital image represents an illegitimate substitution for “the real thing.” In two movements, this article first suggests why such a term radically misunderstands both the relationship of digital image to manuscript, and also the nature of the manuscript’s performance of the work it represents. A second movement illustrates the performative propensity of manuscript technology—under the impetus of the sudden accumulation of vernacular adaptations of classical works fostered by Charles V in the 1370s—to influence court culture.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2162-9552
Print ISSN
2162-9544
Pages
pp. 26-58
Launched on MUSE
2015-07-30
Open Access
No
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