Abstract

This article challenges received wisdom regarding the politics of intertextuality between Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o’s A Grain of Wheat and the novel it rewrites, Joseph Conrad’s Under Western Eyes. Instead of reading strictly for their “political” themes of betrayal and disenchantment, as most critics have done, I develop a politics of form by examining the novels’ formal rendering of what I call the “temporality of revolution”: a contradictory flux that ejects the subject from a stable experience of time. I demonstrate how Ngũg’s rereading of Conradian modernism takes a more radical position that pluralizes narrative structure, shifting the locus of revolutionary crisis from private, individual experience to the public domain.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 38-55
Launched on MUSE
2015-07-26
Open Access
No
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