Abstract

Reading Countée Cullen’s little known 1940 text The Lost Zoo (that imagines the animals left behind by the Biblical flood), this essay recovers the queerness of uplift discourses in the Harlem Renaissance. I argue that Cullen draws on the queer resources of the Noah story and its narration in Christopher Smart’s Jubilate Agno (1939) in ways that temporally remap the periodization of the Harlem Renaissance. I call this process “collective queer remembering” and offer it as an alternative to Houston Baker’s “renaissancism” and Issac Julien’s “meditation” in Looking for Langston (1989).

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Additional Information

ISSN
1945-6182
Print ISSN
1062-4783
Pages
pp. 191-202
Launched on MUSE
2015-07-17
Open Access
No
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