Abstract

Given its by now canonical status as the exemplary grief memoir, I read The Year of Magical Thinking as a narrative that illuminates the spatiality of mourning, or the ways in which the newly bereaved experience specific locations over time. Two currently important theoretical strands within bereavement studies—the spatial turn and memory/memorialization—inform my analysis. I argue that Didion’s evolving experience of the vortex effect, as she refers to a place’s ability to set forward a series of memorial associations, as well as her reliance on spatial imagery to convey the sense of loss, shows that grief does not only unfold over time but also across space.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1456
Print ISSN
0162-4962
Pages
pp. 935-952
Launched on MUSE
2015-07-06
Open Access
No
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