Abstract

This article examines a sugya in BT Berakhot about interactions between the living and the dead and argues that attention to gender is crucial to discerning theological themes that animate it. Bodies in this sugya are vividly gendered and pointedly juxtaposed. The sugya’s editors construct a striking contrast between living (male) rabbis, who adorn themselves with distinctively male ritual objects (phylacteries and fringes), and a dead (female) innkeeper, who yearns for objects needed for female adornment (comb and makeup). I argue that the sugya’s editors communicate the urgency of using the (male) body to respond to divine command while still living by juxtaposing it to a female body in the realm of the dead.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1565-5288
Print ISSN
0793-8934
Pages
pp. 120-133
Launched on MUSE
2015-07-01
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.