Abstract

One of Louise Tilly’s most widely cited articles was “Women’s Work and European Fertility Patterns” (1976), coauthored with Joan Scott and Miriam Cohen. The subject of the article was a major increase in female illegitimacy at the time of the Industrial Revolution, which Tilly regarded as an instance of female vulnerability caused by isolation and urban migration. Surveys of recent writings by American and British historians about this subject suggest the impact of contemporary attitudes toward female sexual autonomy. This literature offers a far more positive portrait of the causes and consequences of female illegitimacy than Tilly provided.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-8034
Print ISSN
0145-5532
Pages
pp. 105-112
Launched on MUSE
2015-06-29
Open Access
No
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