Abstract

Three forms of narrative heuristics are identified and explored in the search for political inclusiveness, robustness, and legitimacy: (1) environmental topics: toxics and the need for second-order or reflexive institutions of modernization; water and the need for getting beyond zero-sum games; urban public goods and infrastructures; medical services and distributed care; animals and biodiversity and the need to pay attention to feedback that signals our inability to achieve perfect control and hence dependence on one another; (2) perspectival topoi: single-eyed stories of identity, ownership, interest, and mastery; double-voiced stories of mutual recognition, sub-versions, and alternative realities; and triangulated stories of polyvocal, interactive, risk-taking experimentalism; (3) processual narratives of structural transformation: political economies (agrarian, industrial, and postindustrial), second-order modernization and biopolitical forms of governance from societies of discipline to societies of control or regulation (by codes, flows, distributed feedback, desubjugated knowledges, and capillaries of micropower); ecological feedback systems; and new grammars of multitude or modes of enhanced self-organized civil society coordination that can either work around governments and bureaucracies or can create public spheres from which to address and pressure government.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1751-7435
Print ISSN
1743-2197
Pages
pp. 159-191
Launched on MUSE
2016-07-06
Open Access
No
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