Abstract

During the first decades of the 19th century, a number of prominent scientists conducted experiments in the revival of dead organisms using new galvanic technologies. In several cases, these experiments were conducted on human bodies, using the corpses of executed criminals. Such experiments captured the cultural imaginary of the day, posing new questions about the relationship between emergent technologies, automated movement, and human agency. This article examines the role played by spectacle, aesthetics, and new practices and technologies of visualization in these scientific experiments.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1530-9282
Print ISSN
0024-094X
Pages
pp. 276-277
Launched on MUSE
2015-06-11
Open Access
No
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