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  • Contributors

Kristina Busse is an active media fan and independent scholar who has published various essays on fan fiction and fan culture in Cinema Journal, Camera Obscura, Popular Communications, Participations, and elsewhere. She is coeditor of Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet (2006), “Sherlockand Transmedia Fandom (2012), and The Fan Fiction Studies Reader (2014). Busse is founding coeditor of the open-access fan studies journal Transformative Works and Cultures.

Abigail De Kosnik is an assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley. Her book on digital archives, Rogue Memory, is forthcoming (MIT Press). She has published articles on media fandom, popular digital culture, and performance studies in Cinema Journal, International Journal of Communication, Modern Drama, Transformative Works and Cultures, and elsewhere. She is coeditor of The Survival of Soap Opera: Transformations for a New Media Era (2011).

Karen Hellekson is an independent scholar who has published in the fields of science fiction, TV and film, and fan studies. She is coeditor of Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet (2006) and The Fan Fiction Studies Reader (2014). She is founding coeditor of the open-access fan studies journal Transformative Works and Cultures.

Alexis Lothian is assistant professor of women’s studies and LGBT studies at University of Maryland, College Park. Her work has been published in International Journal of Cultural Studies, Cinema Journal, Camera Obscura, Social Text Periscope, and Journal of Digital Humanities; she was a founding member of the editorial team for Transformative Works and Cultures and edited a 2013 special issue of Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology.

Suzanne Scott is an assistant professor in the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas at Austin. Her work has appeared in Transformative Works and Cultures, New Media and Society, and collections such as How to Watch Television and The Participatory Cultures Handbook. Her current book project examines the gendered tensions underpinning the media industry’s embrace of fans as tastemakers and promotional partners within convergence culture.

Mel Stanfill is a research postdoctoral fellow of communications and media at the Institute of Communications Research at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Stanfill’s research examines emergent norms of audience behavior in the Internet era with respect to inequalities of economics, law, technology, race, gender, and sexuality. Stanfill has published in New Media and Society, Critical Studies in Media Communication, Communication Theory, and Transformative Works and Cultures. [End Page 155]

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
p. 155
Launched on MUSE
2015-04-25
Open Access
No
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