Abstract

I situate the controversial critical strategies of distant reading and surface reading in the reception history of Gertrude Stein, an author whose work was frequently declared “unreadable.” I argue that an early twentieth-century history of compromised forms of reading, including women’s reading and information work, subtends both the technology with which distant reading may be carried out and the ways in which an author’s work comes to be understood as a corpus in the first place.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 281-312
Launched on MUSE
2015-03-10
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.