Abstract

From the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century American Catholic bishops were mainly guided by two priorities in their work on behalf of migrants arriving in the United States: providing for the pastoral and material needs of their flock and advocating for fellow Catholics. In the second half of the twentieth century the primary rationale behind the bishops’ migration-related activities began to shift. Although pastoral and institutional considerations remained important, a universal moral ethic—a “social mission”—became more pronounced as the guiding force behind the Church’s work with migrant populations.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-0708
Print ISSN
0008-8080
Pages
pp. 74-99
Launched on MUSE
2015-03-02
Open Access
No
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