Abstract

This study is one of very few studies of water insecurity in northern Indigenous communities in Canada. In this first phase, we aimed to understand the multiple dimensions and effects of long-term water insecurity in remote Indigenous communities in Canada and to identify coping strategies. This paper presents exploratory findings on water quality, access, use, impacts, and coping mechanisms in the Southern Inuit community of Black Tickle-Domino, Labrador. We used qualitative and quantitative methods and our research built on the participant observation of two research-team members. We also tested water samples and trained residents to do so. Chronic water insecurity is associated with poor community health, especially food security.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1933-8139
Print ISSN
0066-6939
Pages
pp. 9-22
Launched on MUSE
2015-02-20
Open Access
No
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