Abstract

This essay explores the War of 1812 and its aftermath from the vantage point of Piqua, Ohio. Piqua was the seat of a U.S. Indian agency. During the war, it was the site of negotiations between the U.S. and a variety of Indian groups, as well as a refugee center for pro-American Delawares. Despite Delaware support for the U.S. during the war, their relations with local settlers was poor. The agent at Piqua facilitated the 1818 Treaty of St. Mary’s, which was only the second federal treaty removing Indians west of the Mississippi, and the first in the North.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-0620
Print ISSN
0275-1275
Pages
pp. 25-54
Launched on MUSE
2015-02-19
Open Access
No
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