Abstract

The article presents Sadeh’s religious world, i.e., the theological ideas he introduces in his essays, and demonstrates that despite growing closer to Judaism, he did not change his ideas—he simply enunciated them in a “Jewish” language. The last section analyzes Sadeh’s religiosity within a broader context, particularly within the entire scope of attempts by Israeli intellectuals to define their Jewish identity and their attitude towards religious tradition.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-201x
Print ISSN
1084-9513
Pages
pp. 159-179
Launched on MUSE
2015-01-11
Open Access
No
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