Abstract

This essay examines the annotations of three readers of the Dartmouth Brut. Each engaged the manuscript in different ways: the first had prior knowledge of its contents, the second used the text to teach himself English history, and the third mined the chronicle as a primary source for facts. Together, these readers provide insight into why a medieval chronicle—outdated in content and manuscript form—would continue to attract the attention of early modern readers.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2162-9552
Print ISSN
2162-9544
Pages
pp. 284-303
Launched on MUSE
2014-12-29
Open Access
No
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