Abstract

Drawing on archival evidence, “Moving In and Stepping Out” reinterprets Gwendolyn Brooks’s novel Maud Martha, her long poem, “The Life of Lincoln West,” and her volume of poetry for children, Bronzeville Boys and Girls through an intertextual lens. Together, this cluster of texts supports a reassessment of Brooks’s midcentury project, one which suggests a pre-1967 shift toward black aesthetics and a revised vision of that aesthetic to include a particular emphasis on the poetics and geographies of childhood as unsuspected vehicles for stepping outside of established social narratives of race, gender, and age subordination.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1945-6182
Print ISSN
1062-4783
Pages
pp. 145-160
Launched on MUSE
2014-11-23
Open Access
No
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