Abstract

In “Sounds of Sympathy,” I contextualize William Wells Brown’s Anti-Slavery Harp (1848) within the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American hymnodic reforms, the ecstatic singing of the Second Great Awakening, minstrelsy, the rise of the Hutchinson Family Singers, and the culture of antislavery song more generally. Ultimately, I argue that Brown’s songbook—which included two of his own compositions—was Brown’s effort to harness sound as a tool to aid abolition.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1945-6182
Print ISSN
1062-4783
Pages
pp. 83-100
Launched on MUSE
2014-11-23
Open Access
No
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