Abstract

This article argues that, in addition to being a trustworthy personal history, Harriet Jacobs’s autobiographical slave narrative, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, may be read alongside some of America’s well-known fiction writers as working within the Romance tradition. Jacobs’s narrative goes far beyond a strict retelling of events, and incorporates important literary techniques, as an effort to articulate not only the objective horrors of historical American slavery, but also to provide readers with a profound and transcendent “inner” view of the lived experience of slavery.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1945-6182
Print ISSN
1062-4783
Pages
pp. 69-81
Launched on MUSE
2014-11-23
Open Access
No
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