Abstract

The Household Edition of Dickens’s works (1871–1879) has been labeled both “monumental” and a great “popular success.” Critics, however, have neglected its importance, focusing instead on the original serialized appearance of his fiction. Taking this neglect as its starting point, this article analyses the physical form of the edition, considering in particular its new illustrations and their reception in the popular culture of the late Victorian period. Its analysis reveals that the Household Edition played a significant role in the posthumous reception of Dickens, simultaneously celebrating his achievements and updating his works for a later generation of readers.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1499
Print ISSN
1098-7371
Pages
pp. 321-364
Launched on MUSE
2014-10-24
Open Access
No
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