In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • Contributors

ALFONSO ALONSO is managing director of field programs in the Center for Conservation Education and Sustainability, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park. He received his PhD in zoology from the University of Florida in 1994. He is a coeditor of Monitoring Biodiversity: Lessons from a Trans-Andean Megaproject (Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2013), which demonstrates how to integrate conservation needs with development priorities to sustain biodiversity. He is currently working on a manuscript on how conservation and development partnerships work toward avoiding, mitigating, restoring, and offsetting project impacts, and how to develop best practices to protect biodiversity and maintain ecosystem services. He may be contacted by e-mail at alonsoa@si.edu.

MARY JO ARNOLDI is curator of African ethnology and chair of the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. She has published numerous articles on Malian arts and masquerades. She was a curator for African Voices, the permanent exhibition on African history and culture at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, and she recently cocurated the exhibition Mud Masons of Mali with Trevor Marchand at that museum. She may be contacted by e-mail at arnoldim@si.edu.

FRANCISCO DALLMEIER is director of the Center for Conservation Education and Sustainability of the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute. He received his MS and PhD in wildlife management from Colorado State University. He is a coeditor of Monitoring Biodiversity: Lessons from a Trans-Andean Megaproject (Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2013), which demonstrates how to integrate conservation needs with development priorities to sustain biodiversity. He has published more than 150 reports, articles, and books. He has developed partnerships that promote the integration of biodiversity conservation into mainstream sustainable development and best practices. He has been working in Gabon since 2000 and has established cross-sector partnerships in Madagascar, Uganda, Peru, Canada, Ecuador, Russia, and Southeast Asia. He may be contacted by e-mail at dallmeierf@si.edu.

LILA K. KHATIWADA is a monitoring and evaluation specialist at the Notre Dame Initiative for Global Development, University of Notre Dame, near South Bend, Indiana. He received his PhD in rural sociology from the University of Missouri in 2010. His research interests include understanding effects of development interventions in the lives of rural people. He is [End Page 155] currently implementing projects in Ghana, Guatemala, Indonesia, Ethiopia, and Uganda. He may be contacted by e-mail at lkhatiwa@nd.edu.

LISA KORTE is director of the Gabon Biodiversity Program at the Smithsonian Institution. She completed a PhD in zoology at Michigan State University in 2007. Her research is on the social and spatial organization of African mammals, and she has extensive field experience in Central Africa. She has published journal articles and a book chapter on African buffalo. She may be contacted by e-mail at kortel@si.edu.

KAREN E. MILBOURNE is Curator at the National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, in Washington DC. She received her Ph.D. in Art History from The University of Iowa in 2003. Her book, Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa was co-published by Monacelli Press and the National Museum of African Art in 2013. An exhibition of the same name is currently on tour. Milbourne has published articles, book chapters, and exhibition catalogues on contemporary African art and artists and Lozi arts and pageantry of Western Zambia. She may be contacted by e-mail at milbourneK@si.edu.

MARY CORBIN SIES is associate professor of American studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. She received her PhD in American culture from the University of Michigan in 1987. She is the coeditor (with Christopher Silver) of Planning the Twentieth-Century American City and the author of several articles and book chapters on the history of US suburbs. She is coediting a volume (with Robert Freestone and Isabelle Gournay) to be titled The Heritage of Iconic Planned Communities and the Challenges of Change. Her research explores the intersections of cultural landscape studies, planning history, architectural history, American suburbia, historic preservation, and cultural sustainability studies. She may be contacted e-mail at marycorbinsies@yahoo.com.

JULIE A. SILVA is assistant professor of geographical sciences...

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-1978
Print ISSN
0001-9887
Pages
pp. 155-157
Launched on MUSE
2014-10-19
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.