Abstract

This article examines the relationship between gender, class, & space during the closing decades of the “Age of Sail” (1760–1810). Using onboard diaries of male and female Quaker itinerant ministers, it explores the relationships between cabin and steerage passengers as well as those between passengers, captain, and crew. It argues that many passengers attempted to recreate the gendered and classed divisions observed on land as a way of engineering stability and security—two feelings lost to the disorientation of a transatlantic voyage. Thus, far from being a space of exception, life at sea proved to replicate and reinforce the social space of land.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 89-106
Launched on MUSE
2014-10-09
Open Access
No
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